Why Latino Voters Can Be the ‘Unstoppable Giant’

This election makes me feel a little bit of everything, but not exactly how I expected to feel for my first time voting.

I was born in the U.S. but lived in Mexico for 15 years. I used to think that voting would never, ever make a change in society. But that has a lot to do with Mexico’s history.

I came back to the United States at age 17 in 2012. Just when I started getting into the groove of sunny California, Obama vs. Romney happened.

I didn’t vote. I wasn’t into politics and change as much as I am now. So, yes, I let four years of my life slide under the rug rather than contributing to the future of the country.

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Citizenship with a Side of Adobo

Citizenship with a Side of Adobo

I learned what it means to be a U.S. citizen at the family dinner table.

My earliest memories are of the vivid stories my parents told me, stories that shaped the values I hold to this day and that emphasized the playing an active role in shaping and improving our world.

Over warm bowls of sinigang, my father told my brother, sister and me how he marched in Selma, Alabama and stood with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in the historic battle for civil rights.

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How U.S. Citizenship Can Help You Achieve Your American Dream

Mark L. Keam

“I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”

These are the very first words that I utter on the floor of the Virginia House of Delegates at the beginning of each legislative day.

As the first Asian-born immigrant elected to Virginia’s state legislature since it began meeting in 1619, these words have tremendous personal meaning to me.

When I place my right hand over my heart and recite the Pledge of Allegiance, the words penned in 1892 by Francis Bellamy remind me of that day in December 1991 when I became an American citizen by choice.

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To Pay Our Parents Back, Help Them Become U.S. Citizens

To Pay Our Parents Back, Help Them Become U.S. Citizens

Like millions of other immigrant families, my family came to this country with not much more than the change in our pockets. Born in Guangzhou, China, I was four years old when we moved to the United States. I grew up in southwest Houston, where I now have the honor of serving as a member of the Texas House of Representatives.

While my family’s specific story may differ, our experiences echo those of other immigrants. Our fathers suffered long and brutal days working for little money in jobs that didn’t respect their intelligence or education. Our mothers scrimped and sacrificed to make ends meet, and to give us the best education possible. Our parents endured the physical hardships, endured the insults of people strange to them, and continued demeaning jobs because they believed in something better. Something better for us.

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Becoming a U.S. Citizen During Constitution Week

Becoming a U.S. Citizen During Constitution Week

The U.S. Constitution: it’s a legalistic document that takes about a half-hour to read. Yet it changed the course of history, by encoding the basic principles and values that have managed to sustain our nation as a beacon burning bright for the world for more than two centuries.

Which is why U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) takes special pride in naturalizing new citizens – good people drawn by that beacon — during Constitution Week. These ceremonies are an appreciation of the historic connection to the roughly 4,500 words that these brand-new Americans just swore an oath to support and defend.

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Avoid Payment Scams: USCIS Does Not Accept Fees By Phone or Email

Immigrants all over the country are being targeted in scams. Don’t be one of the victims! Scammers may call or email you, pretending to be a government official. They will say that there is a problem with an application or additional information is required to continue the immigration process. They will then ask for personal and sensitive details, and demand payment to fix any problems.

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30,000 Muslim refugees accepted in U.S. in 2016

The U.S. has accepted more Muslim refugees than any other religious group during the current fiscal year, according to data compiled by the Pew Research Center.

Nearly half of the more than 63,000 refugees who have been granted residency this year are Muslim – marking the highest number since fiscal year 2002 when self-reported data on religious affiliation was first made public.

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