Experts Say Depression Rates Among Latinos Likely to Rise Under Trump

Why Experts Say Depression Rates Among Latinos Likely to Rise Under Trump

NEW ORLEANS, La. — In 2014, Professor Patrick Johansson of the University of Nebraska Medical Center conducted a study of over 400 older Latinos in rural areas of his state. Among the findings were that Hispanics “experience a high degree of depression due to perceived discrimination.”

The analysis, which is currently under review for scientific publication, found that those who reported high levels of discrimination also had a 60-70 percent rate of depression, said Johansson, who spoke at the Gerontological Society of America (GSA) Conference in New Orleans last week.

That study came before Donald Trump famously launched his presidential campaign earlier this year, deriding Mexicans coming into the United States as “rapists” and “murderers.”

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What Immigrant Communities Can Do to Prepare for Trump

What Immigrant Communities Can Do to Prepare for Trump

SAN FRANCISCO — Two days after Donald Trump’s victory, immigration experts told reporters to keep a close eye on the president-elect’s transition team and his appointments to key government positions, for clues as to what to expect from his administration once he is sworn in on Jan. 20, 2017.

“We’re hearing a lot of questions and, honestly, a little bit of panic,” said Sally Kinoshita, deputy director of Immigrant Legal Resource Center.

But, she said, it’s important to put the election in context.

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Muslim Girl Terrified to Return to School After Classmate Beats Her, Rips Off Hijab

Muslim Girl Terrified to Return to School After Classmate Beats Her, Rips Off Hijab

MINNEAPOLIS – The Minnesota chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations is calling out a north metro middle school for what it calls a “lack of response” following an alleged incident where a Muslim girl’s hijab was pulled off.

The girl had her headscarf forcibly removed by another student and thrown to the ground at school Nov. 11, according to a press release from the organization.

Once the girl’s hijab was on the ground, her classmate pulled her hair so that it fell down in front of other classmates, the release states.

The girl has not returned to Northdale Middle School, where she feels unsafe, according to the release.

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The Black Press Faces New Reality in the Era of Trump

Why The Black Press Faces New Reality in the Era of Trump

African-American history has mostly been told through the eyes of black journalists and kept in the pages of black newspapers. The Chicago Defender and the New York Amsterdam News, and great journalists like Ida B. Wells, Chuck Stone and Ethel Payne, all had to tell our stories when white newspapers, radio and television denied our existence as anything other than a threat. If you want to know the story of protests against police brutality in 1920s Baltimore, you check out the archives of the Baltimore Afro-American. If you want to know how the Rosewood massacre in Florida actually started, it was in the black press.

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Why African-Print Fashion Now? A Story of Taste, Globalization, and Style

African-Print Fashion Now! A Story of Taste, Globalization, and Style (on view March 26–July 30, 2017) will feature the dynamic and diverse dress traditions of African-print cloth—the boldly patterned and brightly colored textiles popular across Africa—and their increasing connections to the international fashion and contemporary art worlds.

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Record Number of Asian American Pacific Islanders Elected to Congress

Record Number of Asian American Pacific Islanders Elected to Congress

Louis Chan

As AsAmNews predicted, voters elected a record number of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders to Congress Tuesday.

14 AAPI voting members of Congress were elected, surpassing by 2 the previous record.

Those elected include California Attorney General Kamala Harris who will become the first Indian American woman elected to the U.S. Senate. She beat Rep Loretta Sanchez 63% -37%.

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TOYS: A Dark Fairy Tale

TOYS: A Dark Fairy Tale

Shari was born into a war-torn country, alone and fending for herself; Clara grew up in New York with seemingly the best of everything. These two very different characters, who led very different lives, undertake a surreal journey to meet in an explosive encounter and discover a shared secret from their past in TOYS: A Dark Fairy Tale. In this dramedy written by award-winning playwright Saviana Stanescu, you’ll piece together a life that was torn apart by war as the characters — our alternate identities — find themselves reunited after 30 years. With suspense and humor, the artists bring the eclectic imagery of the Los Angles Art Scene to Europe.

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What Immigrant Communities Can Do to Prepare for Trump

Donald Trump and the Politics of Improvisation

The spirit of improvisation finds its ultimate expression in the workings of American democracy. Like improvisation, democracy believes every voice, however marginal or foolish, should be heard, every vote counted.

Then along came Donald J. Trump whose irrepressible spontaneity knocks much of this rosy vision about improv and democracy into a cocked hat. Presidential historian Jon Meachum calls Trump “Unabashedly improvisational.” David Axelrod describes him as “an improvisational performer, long on chutzpah and borscht belt put-downs but short on facts.” We’ve all seen it. The man gives no thought to the next thing out of his mouth. If Hermes the Trickster, the lord of boundary crossing, god of thieves and liars was the first improviser, Donald Trump the con man is his dark doppelganger, a dark echo point by point.

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Sister Watches Helplessly as Uninsured Brother Slowly Slips Away

My brother, Jesus Eduardo Sevilla, was 56 when he died last year in Fresno, Calif., after battling a degenerative neurological disorder for four years. He was uninsured because of his undocumented status.

Jesus was a father of five, a grandfather of nine and my baby brother. He embraced life. He made everyone laugh, including the doctors and nurses who cared for him at the Fresno Medical Center. They were moved by his attitude, his personality and his compassion. At his funeral, I learned so much from each grandchild about all the things he meant to them.

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California Based African-Born Soldier Frank Musisi, From Captain To Major In The United States Army

How California Based African-Born Soldier Frank Musisi Rose From Captain To Major In The United States Army

On October 14th 2016, Captain Frank Musisi’s journey culminated into a beautiful pit stop when he was honored as Major in the US Army, a shift in rank that would bring bigger and greater responsibilities. An extraordinary event at the 79th SSC headquarters at Joint Forces Training Base Los Alamitos, California, Major Musisi shared his journey, which like every immigrant experience was fraught with challenges and ultimately success for those who work hard and are determined to succeed.

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