Sureshbhai Patel Didn't Get Justice Because He Couldn't Speak English

Sureshbhai Patel Didn’t Get Justice Because He Couldn’t Speak English

Sureshbhai Patel went for a walk in Huntsville, Alabama. He ended up paralysed, beaten up not by muggers or hoodlums but by the city’s own policemen. The story caused an international furore. A 57-year-old grandfather thrown down face first by the police because he spoke no English. Officer Eric Parker was arrested and charged with use of “excessive force”. The Governor of Alabama, Robert Bentley, personally apologized to India and in a letter addressed to the Consul-General in Atlanta hoped that “Mr. Patel will regain full use of his legs” and assured the Indian government as well as Indians living and working in the state that “we will see that justice is done”.



Garifuna International Indigenous Film Festival Call For Submissions

The Garifuna International Indigenous Film Festival (GIIFF) is happy to take audiences and moviegoers on a global journey celebrating culture through art and film. Please be a part of this experience by submitting your films for the 5th Annual Garifuna Indigenous International Film Festival.

The GIIFF, currently one of the nation’s most prestigious film festivals celebrating both Caribbean and indigenous cultures from around the world will be held on May 26-30, 2016 in Venice, California.


Temporary Protected Status Extended for Sudan

WASHINGTON—Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson has extended Sudan’s designation for Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for an additional 18 months due to the ongoing armed conflict and extraordinary and temporary conditions in Sudan that prevent its nationals from safely returning. The extended designation is effective May 3, 2016, through November 2, 2017.


Get DACA, Pursue Your Dream Job

Get DACA, Pursue Your Dream Job

Claudia J. Gonzalez

Photo courtesy of Adriana Meza

MERCED, Calif.– Adriana Meza jokes about being afraid to “accidentally” cross the border while driving to visit her boyfriend at the Marine Corps Base in San Diego.

Joking was a luxury she never had before.

The 24-year-old says it was nerve-wracking the first time she headed to Southern California, believing she would somehow end up in Mexico and never be able to return home.


Iowa and National Evangelical Leaders Send Letter to Presidential Candidates Regarding Immigrants

DES MOINES — In a letter today, evangelical leaders across Iowa are sending a message to presidential candidates to encourage a compassionate response to immigrants and refugees, as guided by Scripture.

Joined by five national evangelical leaders, the 32 Iowa signatories seek a biblical approach regarding immigrants and immigration. The letter is also featured in a digital ad buy: a takeover of the Des Moines Register’s Caucuses page.


#OscarsSoWhite, Again: A Symptom of Hollywood’s Racism

Once again, the 2016 Academy Award best acting nominations are all white — a repeat of 2015 despite widespread criticism expressed by the Twitter hashtag #OscarsSoWhite. But while reading about the Academy Award nominations, my thoughts turned to the tragic image of the late Misty Upham, a Native American actress of the Blackfeet Nation who appeared during the 2015 Oscars telecast in the “In Memoriam” montage while Meryl Streep looked on.


It's Past Time to Tune Out the 'White Oscars'

It’s Past Time to Tune Out the ‘White Oscars’

Let’s talk about the only thing that the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences understands. That’s dollars and cents. African Americans spend far more dollars proportionately on Hollywood films than any other segment of the film-going public. According to a comprehensive BET research study, they make nearly 200 million trips to the movies yearly. That averages out to more than 13 movie trips for African Americans versus barely 11 for the general movie-going audience. They are more likely to make repeat visits to movies that they like. This adds up to more than $500 million in added spending. They go to the movies more often each month. The average is more than two times per month, or nearly 30 movies a year. And, contrary to the popular view, they don’t just go see “black themed” films that are heavy with black stars. In fact, more than 80 percent of the movies African Americans go see do not feature a black cast or storyline.


The Odyssey - From Vietnam to America: An Interview with Van-Anh Vo

The Odyssey – From Vietnam to America: An Interview with Van-Anh Vo

Oscar-nominated and Emmy Award-winning composer Vân-Ánh Võ premieres her new musical epic this month in San Francisco, inspired by the experiences of the Vietnamese Boat People. Integrating traditional and new instruments, video, field recordings and interviews with survivors, The Odyssey–From Vietnam to America reflects the resilience of the human spirit and the price of freedom. The work was created in partnership with Asian Americans for Community Involvement (AACI). She spoke with New America Media editor Andrew Lam.


DHS Enhances Opportunities for H-1B1, E-3, CW-1 Nonimmigrants and Certain EB-1 Immigrants, Final Rule Posted

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) amended its regulations today to improve the programs serving the H-1B1, E-3 and CW-1 nonimmigrant classifications and the EB-1 immigrant classification, and remove unnecessary hurdles that place such workers at a disadvantage when compared to similarly situated workers in other visa classifications.